RV refrigerator drain tube failure

Our Airstream Safari trailer became 9 years old last December when I discovered that our Dometic refrigerator drainage tube was falling apart behind the lower, vented, outside panel door of the refrigerator compartment.  The OEM white, thin plastic drainage tubing becomes brittle and falls apart, some say as early as 3-years old, undoubtedly accelerated by being near heat.

DSC002 Broken refrig drain tube

This was not an immediate problem because water only drains out of this tubing when defrosting the refrigerator or when condensation forms and drips from the cooling fins, and we live and camp in a relatively dry climate.  Typically, we can go 2-3 trips before needing to defrost the refrigerator.

(Defrosting for me goes quickly: I choose a warm afternoon and place a fan on the covered lobster sink directly across from the opened refrigerator door. I turn off the refrigerator, prop open the freezer door and, as the fan blows warm air into the refrigerator, I use chopsticks to gently nudge the melting ice sections off the fins and slide the chunks toward me and catch them in a Tupperware lid and deposit them on nearby plants.  Water that drips from the fins is collected in the condensation drain pan and flows through its bottom hole into the Dometic white drain pipe with cup, which connects with the drainage tubing on the backside of the refrigerator.)

After our third trip to the desert and coyotes this season,* it was time to replace this failed part, so I rustled up three feet of a more durable, vinyl plastic hose from our local West Marine store.

DSC126 PVC tubing from West Marine

Shields Rubber Series 162 Polyester Reinforced Clear PVC Tubing, 1/2″ ID (inside diameter).  I chose this tubing over the clear vinyl tubing because it is reinforced, can tolerate hot water (or being in a hot space such as near the boiler tube), more flexible and is slightly less expensive than their clear vinyl tubing.

DSC134 Shield's Rubber Series 162 PVC tubing

We saved the original Dometic drainage plug (seen above), which is valuable because it keeps critters out of the tubing and currently costs $11.99 to replace!

Some have found that the only way to gain access to where this OEM tubing connects to the Dometic drain pipe in the back of the refrigerator is to move, tilt or slide the refrigerator towards the trailer interior, which involves disconnecting the gas, AC and DC power, and foot screws!  In our case, I was able to reach this spot with my hand.  The old tubing was easy to remove because it disintegrated as I touched it!  The new tubing was attached to the protruding end of the Dometic white drain pipe seen below.  Larry held the pipe/cup from inside the trailer while I pushed the new tubing into place.

DSC142 Dometic drain pipe with cup

Cable (zip) ties were used to secure the tubing connection and to keep it away from the boiler tube seen below.

DSC150 Drain tube held by cable ties

Once the tubing reached the refrigerator compartment floor, it was brought to the opening of the space and secured by the OEM black vinyl coated loop hose clamp and Phillips head screw.

DSC153 Drain tube held by loop hose clamp

At this point, the tubing was trimmed and the Dometic drain plug was inserted.  Refrigerator water is now properly channeled and free to flow under the lower refrigerator access panel door and exit the trailer.  I am confident that this tubing will last for many years to come!

DSC158 Drain tube top to bottom

And future refrigerator defrosting with this upgraded pipeline* will almost be as much fun as surfing the tube!*

*This is a link to a YouTube video.

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